Busan or Bust: Day 5 ~ ‘will I make it out of this alive’ day

In which I discover trick hills and trick trail signs and am aided by a longed-for tailwind

Day 5 ~ 대구 to 남지 (Daegu to Namji) around 100km

4Rivers guide here.

The story so far

It was great to be back on the road after our day off in Daegu. Prepared for the worst, but hoping for the best, I strapped on newly purchased ankle supports, lowered the bike seat a little further, and hit the road.

image

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Busan or Bust: Day 3 ~ ‘make’ day

In which I conquer Ihwaryang pass and escape a rainstorm in the nick of time

Day 3 ~ 수안보 to 상주시 (Suanbo to Sangju) 80km

4Rivers guide here.

Day 3

Day 3

The story so far

I started today’s ride with a photo before we set off from the lacklustre Motel Gloria in Suanbo, convinced from other blogs I’d read that today, hill climb day, could be the ‘break’ day for my legs and my suffering bike. Instead, it has definitely been the ‘make’ day, in which I have discovered that I was, in fact, born to bike, and should immediately quit any other line of work and spend the rest of my life on epic cycle trails around the globe.
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BUSAN or BUST: geared up and in the picture

We’re packed and ready. The bikes are tuned up, the excitement is building, the race is on.

For the last two weeks we’ve been getting bikes serviced, adding bits, (Madame is now sporting a very fetching red seatpost rack and some new ergonomic grips), buying spares (inner tubes, spokes, chain links) and my personal favourites, bike tools. Madame got a new rear tyre as well as the rack and a tune-up, or ‘setting,’ in Korean. Mr MTB (mountain bike) at Mapo MTB patted her and nodded, “Busan? OK.” Then he looked at Wonderboy’s bike, named The Beast for good reason, and laughed. “Busan?” He guffawed, “No no no!” And continued to chortle and mutter good-naturedly until it became clear that was exactly what we intended, at which point he sighed at the crazy foreigners and conceded to our request to tune it up, fix the broken bits and leave us to it.

nice rack

nice rack

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How not to travel – an idiot’s guide

I’m halfway through my monumental whirlwind tour of the ‘gringo trail’ of Peru. It’s been a great trip so far, but I’m going to concentrate today on the valuable lessons I have learned over the course of ten very stressful hours in the last day. The alternative title to this post could be, “Don’t let this happen to YOU!”.

Let’s begin.
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Not a simulacro

We’ve had more earthquake drills over the few months since I wrote about one. They are scheduled regularly on a nationwide scale three times a year, and all public buildings and many private buildings participate in them. On schooldays, this involves the regular stampede from class and the forming of orderly, supportive circles (by which I mean circles in a standing brace position for physical support, rather than circles of people going “there, there, it’s only pretend”) in the field.

As with fire drills back home, everyone secretly welcomes them as an opportunity to get out of doing some work for ten minutes. More

Ups and downs

Cabezas clavas

Cabezas clavas

Holiday time is finally here. The long, dark tea-time of the term is over and it’s the May half-term break. Having been so notably lax at booking holidays on time in the past, we booked our bus tickets and even a nice place to stay almost a month in advance, for once, and decided our destination this time would be the mountain city of Huaraz, home of Perú’s highest mountain (Huascarán, 6700 meters) high in the beautiful cordillera blanca.

The garúa or winter sea fog is starting to set in in Lima, and as with last year’s May break, the search for a last week of sun before the grim, grey winter was an important deciding factor in choosing a destination, More

In – genie – ous

The one big highlight of my y-ear. The one time, no matter how far it may be from the glory days, that I get to put on a character and give my diction a run-out. The one time I get to dress up funny, learn some lines and avoid the furniture for the season of good ch-ear, and it is all brought down by an ear-ily last minute unfortunateness. I felt qu-ear for some time, but finally succumbed last week to a nasty cold, which app-eared to spread sideways through the sinuses until my greatest f-ear was realised. More

Shake, rattle and roll

Like firemen, or the boyscouts, or any other hardy, resourceful groups you care to compare, Perú is ensuring its citizens are always prepared. With this in mind the national civil defence institution (Indeci) organised a nationwide earthquake and tsunami drill on 31st May. More

Feathered friends

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